The Immediate Future of Medical 3D-Printing: Using 3D-Printing to Save Children’s Lives

Tools of Innovation and Technology

Wednesday, May 13, 11:30 am to 11:50 am in Theater

Glenn Green, MD, a leader in the translation of 3D printing into medical practice, describes his perceptions of the advantages and applications of 3D printing in a state-of-the-art surgical practice. He includes recent examples his use of 3D printed templates for presurgical planning, customized medical devices, and life-saving medical implants. He also discusses his recent successful (and not so successful) animal trials and what is needed to bring these new technologies forward to benefit the lives of children.

Speakers

GlennGreen_ProfileImage

Dr. Glenn Green

Associate Professor, University of Michigan
Glenn E. Green, MD, is an Associate Professor of Pediatric Otolaryngology at the University of Michigan who has been leading the translation of 3D printing into clinical practice. He has a clinical interest in communication disorders and improving interventions for breathing, speech and hearing. He has developed surgical techniques and devices for complex airway reconstruction and is coinventor (along with Scott Hollister, PhD) of a life-saving, 3D-printed tracheal splint as well as a number of other medical devices. He is the director of ongoing translational trials of 3D printed medical devices in both humans and animals. He has won several awards ranging from the Kodak Valuable Idea Award (as an undergraduate student) to the Innovation Award from Popular Mechanics (2013 Breakthrough Awards, New York City). He has over 50 publications related to both his clinical and his research work including the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature Genetics, and JAMA. He has been widely featured including Scientific American, the New York Times, Forbes, the New Yorker magazine and Good Housekeeping. His constructs are on featured display at the British Science Museum in London. He continues to focus on using new technologies to benefit the lives of children.

Sessions